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Residents of , file bankruptcy in

0 courthouse serve the .

 Bankruptcy Information


Counties served by the :

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Three Kinds of Information You Will Need from the Court

(Note: Court websites change often and links go out of date. If a link does not work, go to the home page for the court and look for the materials from there.)

Official Website of the

Official Court Website

* Home page

What you'll find there

You'll need to file your papers with one of the courthouses that serve the .

Pre-COVID, you had to go to court, in person, at least once to meet with the bankruptcy trustee for your 341 hearing. During the Coronavirus pandemic, those meetings were typically done by phone or zoom. A few courts may still allow that.


Online Filing (eSR)

Online Filing -

You're in luck! The offers online filing! About one quarter of the nation's bankruptcy courts have started to offer electronic filing (eSR) for debtors not represented by an attorney. Your court is on the leading edge of this exciting new option! Click here to learn more about how to file online with the .


Where To Start

Before you file, there are three kinds of information you'll need to get from the court's website:

1. Info on Filing Without an Attorney

Information specific to your district

You'll need information specifically about your particular court's procedures.

As of this writing, March 2019, it appears that, unlike most courts around the country, the website for the does not offer plain English information about local procedures. Most courts in the nation have already added this information, so check your court's home page to see if they now offer it.

General information about how to file

If you're new to the bankruptcy process, the website of the US Courts Adminstrative Office now offers a basic orentation page for those filing bankruptcy without an attorney. The information inlcudes a Bankruptcy Basics video in English Spanish and Creole. The half hour video is split into chapters so you can go back and review parts that went by too fast the first time.

2. Local Rules

Local Rules -

Each court has its own rules about filing procedure, how to list creditor's names and addresses, and they tend to be fussy about it.

You must comply with the details of the process, such as filing dates, filing procedures, fees, and a myriad of other bureaucratic wonderfulness. Depending on how poorly they're written, your court's local rules probably won't make much sense to you. Don't worry. You may not be affected by most of the rules.

However, you will need to follow the rules about filing procedure and how to format the creditors' "mailing matrix" (a list of creditor's names and addresses).

Ask the court clerk if your court publishes plain-English instructions for those filing without a lawyer. If so, use that first, rather than trying to read the actual rules, or better yet is offering electronic filing, like some courts do.

How to File for BankruptcyChapters 6 and 7 of How to File for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy offer more information on what to look for in local rules and how to ask the court clerk for the information you need as you prepare your paperwork and fill in yourforms.

3. Court Forms

Local Forms

Bankruptcy is a forms-intensive process, kind of like doing a long tax return.

The main forms you use in bankruptcy are federal forms, used nationwide in all bankruptcy courts.

Your bankruptcy court may have additional local forms for the for dealing with things like the list of creditors.

Other information from the court

Most courts link to a downloadable U.S. Courts publication called "Bankruptcy Basics." This offers a decent overview of Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy -- but has no information about how to actually file or fill in the mountain of forms.

Now most courts also link to a helpful YouTube video created by the Federal Courts that explains the bankruptcy process.

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Courthouses of the

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List of Private Trustees by Chapter

Source: The U.S Trustee Program - List of Private Trustees by Chapter

To find private trustees by State and chapter, follow the links below:

State-by-State List of Private Trustees by Chapter
State Private Trustees
Alabama (Note) Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Alaska Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Arizona Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Arkansas Chapter 7 Chapter 13
California Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Colorado Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Connecticut Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Delaware Chapter 7 Chapter 13
District of Columbia Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Florida Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Georgia Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Guam Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Hawaii Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Idaho Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Illinois Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Indiana Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Iowa Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Kansas Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Kentucky Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Louisiana Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Maine Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Maryland Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Massachusetts Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Michigan Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Minnesota Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Mississippi Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Missouri Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Montana Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Nebraska Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Nevada Chapter 7 Chapter 13
New Hampshire Chapter 7 Chapter 13
New Jersey Chapter 7 Chapter 13
New Mexico Chapter 7 Chapter 13
New York Chapter 7 Chapter 13
North Carolina (Note) Chapter 7 Chapter 13
North Dakota Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Northern Mariana Islands Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Ohio Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Oklahoma Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Oregon Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Pennsylvania Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Puerto Rico Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Rhode Island Chapter 7 Chapter 13
South Carolina Chapter 7 Chapter 13
South Dakota Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Tennessee Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Texas Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Utah Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Vermont Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Virgin Islands (U.S.) Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Virginia Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Washington Chapter 7 Chapter 13
West Virginia Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Wisconsin Chapter 7 Chapter 13
Wyoming Chapter 7 Chapter 13

 

NOTE: Bankruptcy cases in Alabama and North Carolina are not under the jurisdiction of the United States Trustee Program. Questions regarding bankruptcy cases filed in the six judicial districts in those states should be directed to the Bankruptcy Administrator for the district where the case is pending. Contact information for the Bankruptcy Administrators is available on the federal judiciary's Web site at http://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy/trustees-and-administrators.